Last month, Santa Monica Next reached out to all 10 candidates for City Council with an 11 question questionnaire. Some questions were written to give voters an idea of the candidates personality, others on their positions. So far, six candidates have responded.

Responses will be printed in random order so that each candidate gets a chance to have their answer printed first. Each candidate will also get at least one of their own meme pictures similar to the one printed here for Councilmember Ted Winterer.

We hope to hear from Mayor Tony Vazquez, Armen Melkonians, Oscar de la Torre and James Watson so we can share their answers for the remaining ten questions.

Today’s question: How are you voting on the college bond measure? Why?

Terry O’Day – 

Next Sponsor

YES – investments in our college are investments in our youth and our community. The entire community benefits from SMC. For our youth, it is access to an affordable, top-notch higher education. To our seniors, it is access to a model continuing education program through the Emeritus College. There is the Broad Stage and gallery space that is a cultural gem.

Mende Smith

Urban Resilience (UR) is an interesting model to consider when looking at this measure. Resilience can reinforce both sustainable and unsustainable developmental pathways. Harnessing resilience to reinforce system dynamics that promote sustainability is key to achieving future desired sustainability states. UR is the capacity of individuals, communities, institutions, businesses, and systems within a city to survive, adapt, and grow no matter what kinds of chronic stresses and acute shocks they experience.

I believe that continually proposing bond measures to grow Santa Monica College is contrary to Urban Resilience. I stand with the renters and the voters of my city on opposing this measure and its effects. Over-budgeting for ongoing projects with bonds that can be used to meet the basic needs of all of our city’s residents – rich and poor.

Ted Winterer – 

Yes on the College bond to replace and upgrade aging existing facilities. To address the achievement gap in public education we need to modernize our community college.

Jon Mann – 

I’m against it. SMC is supposed to be a community college for local students, yet it has a huge international student body and has become big buisness. It is larger than many universities, and a very small percentage of the student body are graduates of Santa Monica High School. Local students have a very difficult time getting tthe classes they need to transfer to a 4 year college. Local residents in the area of the camopuses are inundated by traffic and parking issues. Local home owners already pay an unfair portion of the bonds.

Gleam Davis – 

I am voting Yes on the college bond measure.  The measure is not designed to expand the college’s footprint.  Rather, it is necessary to replace old trailer-type classrooms and renovate existing but obsolete buildings on campus.  A majority of households in Santa Monica benefit from SMC’s varied and engaging programs and it is a special resource for students of all ages who need an inexpensive solution to the high cost of college or who need to sharpen or expand skills to compete more effectively in a challenging economy. 

Terence Later – 

I feel that the people of Santa Monica are experiencing what I call ‘bond fatigue’. Education is important, but we do not need new bonds to pay for it. The money is there, we need to balance our budget with the current bonds in place and make education a priority without raising new taxes.